Pre RM 3

Pre RM 3

Today was a great day for my objectives. We were divided into our respective delegate and were asked to present health care barrier and solution for our own countries. It was truly a great way to find out what eat delegate thought was the greatest shortcoming of their countries’ health care system.
The countries mentioned were Peru, Costa Rica, Columbia, Mexico, Chile, and Ecuador. Of the numerous challenges in health care that delegates presented, two themes were often repeated: existence of a two-tier health care system, and political corruption.
Many South-American countries have accepted the co-existence of a public funded, free health care and a privately funded health care. Over the years, a tendency began to emerge. The private healthcare would thrive thanks to the contribution of both the richer half of the population and the financial support of private insurance companies. Well financed hence well equipped, they appear more attractive to doctors and other healthcare workers. This result in a more efficient and more trusted privately run clinics. As much as private clinic thrived, the public sector suffered. With insufficient funding from government, the public sector does not have the necessary equipment to ensure bare-minimum services to the population. As they gradually become incompetent in providing health services to their people, those who have the financial means turns to the private sector instead, leaving the poorest with a poorly equipped public health care.
Political corruption is tightly coupled with this two-tier health care phenomenon. For example, the government of Columbia contributed to the creation of the two-tier system by handing the country’s healthcare directly into the hands of private insurance companies. These companies, of course, privileges their directly affiliated clinics and hospitals.