What Is SCOPE?

IFMSA-Quebec’s Standing Committee on Professional Exchanges (SCOPE) organizes exchanges every year. In 1951, a student exchange program was set up by IFMSA’s Standing Committee on Professional Exchange (SCOPE). Five years later, 11 countries and 906 students have participated in clinical exchanges. In 2009, nearly 8000 students from some 90 countries went on an internship in the 5 continents. For 6 years now in Quebec, thanks to the clinical exchange committee, around sixty students go on a professional exchange each year, and almost as many students are received in the four faculties of medicine in Quebec. Exchanges in twenty-six different countries are offered, creating an exciting and diverse opportunity for people who are curious and ready to explore the world and medicine at the same time.

Mission

The committee aims to provide an opportunity for medical students from all over the world to participate in an IFMSA professional exchange program, to offer an educational and cultural experience that goes beyond the framework of the regular medical curriculum, and to enable medical students to learn about different forms of medical practice as well as the health issues of another country.

What Is a Clinical Exchange?

  • An opportunity to perfect your medical knowledge in a medical specialty of your choice.
  • An extraordinary cultural experience.
  • An opportunity to see how culture can influence the clinical approach in another country.
  • It is to witness how the hospital structure and the health budget of a country can have an impact on medical practice.
  • An opportunity to meet medical students from all over the world.
  • The chance to practice medicine while having fun.
  • An opportunity to push your limits.
  • This is YOUR chance to become a better doctor.

For any other information or question, please contact:

Juliette Labelle
National coordination, incoming students (NEO-in)
[email protected]

Yihong Yu
National coordination, outgoing students (NEO-out)
[email protected]

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